***UPDATE***Here’s how the NFL really feels about domestic violence ***Warning Possible Trigger***

Standard

***UPDATE***:ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — A law enforcement official says he sent a video of Ray Rice punching his then-fiancee to an NFL executive three months ago, while league officers have insisted they didn’t see the violent images until this week.

The person played The Associated Press a 12-second voicemail from an NFL office number on April 9 confirming the video arrived. A female voice expresses thanks and says: “You’re right. It’s terrible.”

The official, speaking to the AP on condition of anonymity because of the ongoing investigation, says the NFL never followed up. The person can’t confirm if anyone at the NFL watched the video.

The person said he shared the video — which he was unauthorized to release — because he wanted the NFL to have it before deciding on Rice’s punishment.

All this bandwagon Ray Rice bashing and scape goating is missing the point. Yes Mr. Rice was wrong, but the NFL had ALREADY punished him. The release of this video doesn’t change any of the facts! We saw the same incident from another angle in which it is clear how hard he had to have hit her in order to produce the end result, but harsh punishment wasn’t handed out until now…why? Do you honestly expect us to believe that the prosecutor’s office and Rice’s attorneys had this footage but the NFL NEVER saw it? This has become a public relations disaster for the league, that is the only reason we are seeing this type of delayed action. Victim blaming runs rampant when a celebrity or sports star is involved. Have we already forgotten Jovan Belcher and his girlfriend?   If the league and its endorsements are walking away from Rice, who actually admitted he hit his fiancee from the beginning, then why haven’t we walked away from any of the other players accused in similar cases but who still continued to play in the league? Ray McDonald of the 49’s has been charged with the same crime and played this past Sunday…the difference: it wasn’t caught on tape…

I’ll let Michelle Jaworski‘s write up give you a few additional examples….

This story contains descriptions of domestic violence and may be triggering for some readers.

Update: The Ravens ended Rice’s contract Monday afternoon, the team announced on Twitter.

The outrage against Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice has been sparked anew after TMZ published new footage of him beating his then-fiancée (and now-wife), Janay Rice (née Palmer), unconscious.

The video, which is violent and graphic in nature and depicts scenes of domestic violence, showed Rice punching Palmer in the face in an elevator at the now-closed Revel Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City. Previously, the public had only seen what transpired after the fight in the elevator: Rice dragging an unconscious Palmer out of the elevator and into a casino.

Rice entered a one-year diversionary program that, once completed, would allow the third-degree aggravated assault charges against him to be dropped, but the NFL took a different approach. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and other officials with the NFL and the Ravens met with Rice and Palmer to discuss the events, which many feel prohibited her from speaking freely while her abuser was in the same room.

Janay Rice says she deeply regrets the role that she played the night of the incident.

— Baltimore Ravens (@Ravens)May 23, 2014

Rice was suspended for two games and fined $58,000, a punishment many saw as not harsh enough and the NFL has now said it got wrong. The new rules, which wouldn’t apply to Rice, called for an automatic six-game suspension without pay for policies regarding “assault, battery, domestic violence or sexual assault that involve physical force” and those who have a second offense will be banned from the NFL.Two more cases of domestic violence by NFL players have already come up in the two weeks since the NFL changed their policy on domestic violence.

At the time, Sports Illustrated’s Peter King wrote that “the NFL and some Ravens officials have seen” the other videotape, which captured the altercation (and has since reported otherwise), while ProFootballTalk’s Mike Florio said that the NFL hadn’t seen the video.

The NFL’s official statement to TMZ Monday says that while they requested all information related to the incident, “that video was not made available to us and no one in our office has seen it until today.”

tweet

It’s unclear if the NFL will reopen the investigation into Rice. Many people are finding it hard to believe that Goodell hasn’t seen the video footage until now and are even more outraged at Rice’s punishment than before. And it does absolutely nothing to quell the growing idea that the NFL doesn’t care about women (unless it’s their money) and that sexism runs rampid.

tweetass

No less than 29 players were suspended going into the first week (including Rice), the majority of them for substance abuse or performance-enhancing drugs. USA Today has been keeping a log of every NFL player arrested since 2000, and in 2012, Slate published findings showing that 21 of the 32 NFL teams had employed a player who had a record domestic violence or sexual assault charge.

But how does that compare to other NFL players convicted of domestic violence, and even those who have been suspended on testing positive for banned substances? In comparison, Cleveland Browns wide receiver Josh Gordon got suspended for an entire season after failing another drug test, and it left a bad taste in the mouths of fans. And if you look at the NFL’s past stance on domestic violence, that taste doesn’t go away, even a little bit.

 

1) A.J. Jefferson, Minnesota Vikings cornerback

Jefferson, who was charged with felony domestic violence after his girlfriend told police that he choked her in November 2013, got swiftly dropped by the Vikings, but he didn’t stay unemployed for too long. Picked up by the Seattle Seahawks, the most recent Super Bowl champions, he’s currently on the injured reserve list after injuring his ankle in a preseason game. The NFL as a whole didn’t punish him.

 

2) Chad Johnson, Miami Dolphins wide receiver

At one time one of the most visible NFL players on Twitter, Johnson was arrested in August 2012 and charged with misdemeanor domestic battery after his then-wife, who he married the month before, accused him of headbutting her during an argument. The Dolphins dropped him a day later, but he received no further punishment from the NFL. He hasn’t played on a team since.

 

3) Dez Bryant, Dallas Cowboys wide receiver

Bryant turned himself in and was charged with misdemeanor domestic violence charges in 2012 after he allegedly pushed his mother during an argument. He was never punished by the NFL, and he still plays for the Cowboys, even having a part in the disastrous season opener against the 49ers. Last year, he said that he was “done with domestic abuse.”

 

4) Brandon Marshall, Chicago Bears wide receiver

The Bears player was charged with domestic violence not once, but twice, and has the lengthy and troubling rap sheet to go along with it. He’s been involved in 10 separate disputes (many of them involving women) for which he’s never been charged. With everything he’s been charged or accused of over the years, he’s only been suspended one game in 2009 due to charges that he abused his girlfriend (for which he’s been acquitted), and he’s completed anger management after another arrest after he prevented a girlfriend’s taxi from leaving his house.

 

5) Quinn Ojinnaka, Atlanta Falcons offensive lineman

He received a one-game suspension from the NFL after he was arrested for pushing his wife down the stairs during an argument. He played for three more teams after leaving the Falcons and even started a professional wrestling career.

 

6) James Harrison, Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker

He was arrested after allegedly hitting his girlfriend, but prosecutors droppedthe charges after he entered counseling and his girlfriend didn’t press charges. He was never punished by the NFL. Eventually released by the Steelers because they couldn’t agree on a pay cut, he played with the Cincinnati Bengals before retiring as a Steeler on Sept. 5.

 

7) Greg Hardy, Carolina Panthers defensive end

He was found guilty of assaulting and threatening a woman by a jury back in July and sentenced to 18 months’ probation. He faces that mandatory six-game suspension recently implemented by the NFL if his guilty verdict isn’t overturned, but right now he is still allowed to play and faces something far more trivial: a fine for violating the NFL dress code if he wears face paint of the “Kraken,” his on-field alterego.

via Click here to see what else dailydot.com has to offer.

***UPDATE***FED UP – AVAILABLE ON BLU-RAY AND DVD SEPTEMBER 9TH!

Standard

FED UP featured on “The Business Insider”  and available for rental on Netflix DVD!

Everything we’ve been told about food and exercise for the past 30 years is dead wrong. FED UP is the film the food industry doesn’t want you to see. From Katie Couric, Laurie David (Oscar winning producer of AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH) and director Stephanie Soechtig, FED UP will change the way you eat forever.

Check out the website fedupmovie.com and make sure to follow the film makers on Twitter for up to date information.

 

via FED UP – Official Trailer – YouTube.

 

 

NIH finally makes good with Henrietta Lacks’ family — and it’s about time, ethicist says

Standard

FOREWORD BY THE EDITOR OF “LOST BELOW THE FOLD”, LAUREN CROOM

For years the Lacks family struggled to preserve the privacy of the very thing that was uniquely proprietary to them, their DNA. This family’s contribution to science can never fully be calculated. They have never seen a dime of the billions of dollars made using their cells, and yet they are still making strides in medicine by paving the way for a more ethical outlook going forward. Thank you Lacks family, for your continued endowments to science and the world at large.

BY ART CAPLAN, PH.D.

Over the past six decades, huge medical advances have sprung from the cells of Henrietta Lacks, a poor, African-American mother of five who died in 1951 of cervical cancer. But Lacks never agreed that the cells from a biopsy before her death taken could be used for research. For years, her own family had no idea that her cells were still alive in petri dishes in scientists’ labs. They eventually learned they had fueled a line called HeLa cells, which have generated billions of dollars, but they didn’t realize until this spring that her genome had been sequenced and made public for anyone to see. 

CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE READING….

Better Identification of Viking Corpses Reveals: Half of the Warriors Were Female | Tor.com

Standard

BY STUBBY THE ROCKET

Shieldmaidens are not a myth! A recent archaeological discovery has shattered the stereotype of exclusively male Viking warriors sailing out to war while their long-suffering wives wait at home with baby Vikings. (We knew it! We always knew it.) Plus, some other findings are challenging that whole “rape and pillage” thing, too.

Researchers at the University of Western Australia decided to revamp the way they studied Viking remains. Previously, researchers had misidentified skeletons as male simply because they were buried with their swords and shields. (Female remains were identified by their oval brooches, and not much else.) By studying osteological signs of gender within the bones themselves, researchers discovered that approximately half of the remains were actually female warriors, given a proper burial with their weapons.

It’s been so difficult for people to envision women’s historical contributions as solely getting married and dying in childbirth, but you can’t argue with numbers—and fifty/fifty is pretty damn good. The presence of female warriors also has researchers now wondering just how accurate the stereotypes of raping and pillaging actually are:

Women may have accompanied male Vikings in those early invasions of England, in much greater numbers than scholars earlier supposed, (Researcher) McLeod concludes. Rather than the ravaging rovers of legend, the Vikings arrived as marriage-minded colonists.

In many ways, this discovery is well-timed with the recent uproar over Thor becoming a title for both sexes instead of an exclusively male name. Fingers crossed this means that pop culture could start including more female warriors than just Sif and Lagertha (from The History Channel’s Vikings, above). Just so long as they’re not wearing boob plate armor.

[USA Today via Jezebel]

CHECK OUT THIS, AND OTHER AWESOME ARTICLES AT TOR.COM.

A Dallas officer is placed on leave for fleeing the scene as a pleading mother and her children dodge gun spray.

Standard

The video you are about watch may be disturbing to some, but not for the reasons you assume.

I was deeply disturbed by the description of events detailed in the video below. More so, I probably would have been skeptical of these details had there not been multiple witnesses(two of which were Police officers).

Watch the video before scrolling…

Dallas officer placed on leave for not helping frantic mother – YouTube.

Now do you understand my distress? For the longest I have been trying to explain that although race plays a role when it comes to discriminatory policing, it isn’t the only factor:

✔ Socioeconomic
✔ Law Enforcement: demographics, moral, training, leadership accountability
✔ Municipal Leadership Demographics

all play major roles as well.The identities of the 4 officers (the three who just passed by and the one writing the ticket) that were not suspended have not been released; however, the identity of the only suspended officer has. Senior Corporal Les Richards, initially asked the victim what was going on and then upon finding out, allegedly fled the scene. He is a 26 year old veteran of the force, and he is BLACK. He shared color, culture, and history with the victim but clearly there was no inbreed sympathy for a citizen in dire need of assistance.

We can’t blame this police disservice on the catch all culprit of racism. I’m starting to think the only way to fix things is transparency and the fear of being caught in the wrong. I am now, more than ever, on board with the idea of every cop being outfitted with a streaming on-body camera. It’s a proven fact that mirrors in stores limit thefts because possible thieves can see themselves and become either too paranoid, embarrassed, or ashamed to commit the act. If both Police and criminals understood that their every move was being watched, and if officers were given performance reviews based on actual video of their interaction with the people they should be serving, crime and rights abuses would both drop. If instead of militarizing the local P.D. we armed them with mediation training, we might actually create less bitter and biased law enforcers and more of a trusting relationship between the cops and those who care to improve their neighborhood.

The world is an ever evolving place technologically, but people haven’t really changed over the millennia. We have better weapons but still haven’t figured out how to relate to each other universally or how to treat each other the way we would chose to be treated.

Let’s just stop, drop the guns, and evolve… Either that or leave the following generations a far worse world than we inherited.

BY LAUREN CROOM  

 

“Hey Ladies! Blame Yourself For Society’s Ills!” — Matter — Medium

Standard

by
Jamilah Lemieux Ann Friedman and Heather Havrilesky

Matter and MSNBC.com are rereading
Susan Faludi’s feminist classic, Backlash. Here’s
our conversation on Chapter 12.

“In the first half of the ’80s, the advice experts told women they suffered from bloated egos and a ‘fear of intimacy’; in the second half, they informed women that atrophied egos and ‘codependency’ were now their problems. In the decade’s war on women, these popular psychologists helped fire the opening shots—then rushed to the battlefield to bandage the many wounds.” — Susan Faludi, Backlash, “Chapter 12 — It’s All in Your Mind: Popular Psychology Joins the Backlash.”

Read more of what the Ladies of Matter and MSNBC.com had to say about Susan Faludi’s feminist classic, Backlash on Medium.